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  • The feature-length sci-fi drama screenplay Incarnations has been selected as a finalist for the Philip K. Dick Science Fiction and Supernatural Film Festival, taking place September 17-19, 2021 at the Musuem of the Moving Image in New York City. Of the 11 feature screenplay finalists, Incarnations is the only one that is a finalist in two categories: Best Science Fiction Screenplay and Best Sci-Fi Prototyping/World Building Screenplay.

    "We are looking at scripts that focus on the nuts and bolts of creating an entire sci-fi world," said Daniel Abella, the founder and director of the event. Abella wants to show festival-goers the precision and accuracy necessary to the craft of screenwriting. "Rather than just prioritizing high concept premises, each of these screenplays deal with originality, characterization, and psychological dimensions on a more granular scale. It is important to note that when telling a good story, the smallest of details truly do matter."

    Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist and philosopher whose published works mainly belong to the genre of science fiction. The novel The Man in the High Castle bridged the genres of alternate history and science fiction, earning Dick a Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1963.

    In addition to 44 published novels, Dick wrote approximately 121 short stories, most of which appeared in science fiction magazines during his lifetime. Although Dick spent most of his career as a writer in near-poverty, eleven popular films based on his works have been produced, including Blade Runner, Total Recall, A Scanner Darkly, Minority Report, Paycheck, Next, and The Adjustment Bureau. In 2007, Dick became the first science fiction writer to be included in the Library of America Series.

    Incarnations, written by Albert, is about a grieving biologist who discovers startling scientific evidence revealing the fate of his deceased four-year-old son, launching him on a spiritual quest where life meets death. The project was previously named a finalist for the Launch Pad Feature Competition, Creative Screenwriting Unique Voices Screenplay Competition, and Screencraft Film Fund.

    Bluecat:

    "THE WRITER DOES A GREAT JOB OF KEEPING THE READER OFF KILTER FROM THE VERY BEGINNING... FROM THAT MOMENT ON, THE READER IS FULLY INVESTED IN THE SCRIPT AND WON'T STOP READING TILL THE END... THE DIALOGUE IN THE SCRIPT ABSOLUTELY CRACKLES... THE WRITER DOES SO WELL TO WRITE SOMETHING THAT SOARS EMOTIONALLY WITHOUT EVER FEELING SENTIMENTAL, CLOYING, OR FALSE... THE SCRIPT IS TRULY UNIQUE. IT'S UNLIKE ANYTHING THE READER HAS SEEN BEFORE: A FASCINATING PREMISE WITH AN ENTHRALLING WORLD."

    WeScreenplay:

    "INCARNATIONS DELIVERS ON ALL THE BEST PARTS OF A GOOD CEREBRAL SPECULATIVE FICTION PIECE. IT DOESN'T SHY AWAY FROM THE HUMAN QUESTIONS RAISED BY THE PREMISE, INSTEAD USING THE CONCEPT TO GROUND A COMPELLING CHARACTER-DRIVEN NARRATIVE FRONT TO END... A WELL-CRAFTED AND DEEPLY INTELLIGENT PIECE OF FICTION, THOUGHT-PROVOKING IN ALL THE RIGHT WAYS."

    "THE CHARACTERS AND RELATIONSHIPS ARE THE STRONGEST PART OF THIS STORY AND IT SETS A STRONG FOUNDATION FOR PLOT... SO MUCH OF THE DIALOGUE IS POWERFUL... REFRESHINGLY HONEST... THE ENDING WAS INCREDIBLY EMOTIVE... THERE ARE MEANINGFUL MESSAGES THAT WE'RE LEFT WITH, THAT WE'VE LEARNT ALONG THE JOURNEY WITH THE CHARACTERS."

    The Black List:

    "CLEVER, ORIGINAL, INTELLECTUALLY STIMULATING, AND GRIPPING, A HIGH CONCEPT IDEA THAT TRANSLATES INTO A SMART CHARACTER- AND IDEA-DRIVEN STORY... THE PLOT TWISTS ARE CONSISTENTLY SURPRISING... THE KIND OF LOW-BUDGET, INTELLECTUAL THRILLER THAT PLAYS AT SUNDANCE... BELONGS TO THE SAME GENRE AS PRIMER, TIMECRIMES, AND OTHER ARTHOUSE SUCCESSES. THE IDEAS ARE KING HERE."

    "THE SCRIPT'S BEST ASSET IS THOMAS: A CAPABLE, SYMPATHETIC PROTAGONIST WITH A TRAGIC PAST WEIGHING HIM DOWN AND DRIVING HIS OBSESSION, EVEN AS HIS COLLEAGUES AND FRIENDS TRY TO GET HIM BACK ON TRACK — THE PUSH-AND-PULL BETWEEN CHARACTERS GIVES THE SCRIPT MUCH OF ITS HEART."